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that leadership and what you remember then. congress had to lead america's foreign policy when it came to the issue of south africa. >> it was a very, very tough time. i got elected two months after ronald reagan vetoed the bill and when i met him at the white house that december, he and i got into a rather loud argument of discussion about why it was wrong. he ultimately relented because the senate would have its way. it was a tough fight. i got involved as a student with the movement and led as a member of the city council during which point mr. mandela found out about it and wrote me a short letter that said thank you so much for your support and in bold letters he said don't give up. i thought that was interesting because we didn't want him to give up. it's a tough way to go and to keep this in context. he was up against quite a bit as were the people of south africa. there were a number of determined people here, black, white, jewish who continued it work on behalf of his freedom. >> senator, we have you on not because you are a senator in the u.s. foreign relations committee, but
for that few years at the state department was best gift. >> the mix of foreign policy to describe her time in state and seem to all agree he was a more cautious secretary of state. but i think that can stem from a number of things. i think she by nature is a more cautious person and maybe thinking about 2016 and also could have been a lot of pressure from the administration to be cautious. i'm with luke, i think the american people have short term memories and b i don't think foreign policy is on their radar. if you look at things they care about, foreign policy is nowhere on that list. they only care with foreign policy as it connects to the economy. if anything, her time at state will benefit her. if you can picture her on the debate stage with chris christie, who doesn't have any foreign policy experience. if you look at it that way, i think it only benefits her. i think benghazi is not going to define her legacy long term. >> speaking of benghazi, there's something we need to compare, the two secretaries of state that preceded her, you find they had several ben gazdyes and it's worth n
's foreign policy. >> this is the key statistic. with only a third on his foreign policy, harris, he's desperate for a deal. bottom line this week, we saw with biden in asia, he was unable to persuade the chinese to stand down in the east china sea. unable to get japan and korea working together. bottom line, the obama administration needs a deal. >> that's an interesting point. >> what they want is about -- it's all about appearance. it's not be substance or rereality. those numbers drive this president. >> you think he looked at those numbers? >> of course. that's all they do. >> you're side of the inside on this. >> i've never seen anything like the way they exercise -- we're in trouble, we make up something. we go out and talk about the income inequality. which i think is a real issue, which is an excuse for your program. remember, the reports record numbers of americans saying that we have lost influence in the world and less powerful than we've been. the depth on foreign policy disaster that the american people perceive of this president is staggering. >> it's not just obama wh
and allowing, at the time, sort of which side of the barricade are you on type of foreign policy and you wonder what is the lesson now, right? what do you takeaway from what frankly where we are, american political culture was slow in many ways. where are we, you know, where are we today. where will we regret in 25 years that we were slow in not being on the right side of an issue or right side of history. >> what nelson mandela has said often when he was dealing with his own internal battles within the black coalition in the government as well as whites which is this idea there was a common purpose for south africa after he was released from south africa and when he came president. that's the kind of lesson that can be shared that transcends south africa in his time. where do countries, where do governments of all branches feel they are in it together and have a common purpose to solve problems, to advance freedom, to advance people from all background. i think that's one of the lessons that he already has given. i think it's amazing that chuck is right, i think he was viewed, mandela was in m
to happen is that american foreign policy should be consistent with the provisions of the united nations charter, which calls upon all member countries to try and settle disputes by peaceful means. as a world leader, we would like the units to set an example in trying to carry out the fundamental principles which are laid down in the freedom -- in the united nations charter. >> it was interesting, mr. ambassador. he really admired bill clinton, the president of the united states, who was there at cape town, but he was not reluctant to criticize the u.s. if he saw the u.s. going in the wrong direction. >> i think that's the model authority that he has. he wants nothing from the world and he owes the world nothing. whatever sacrifice he could have made had been made. nothing more could be done to harm him. that's why i think the power of truth was the one he spoke, but he spoke in such a gentle way. there wasn't the vittry oldic, ideological razzmatazz that he was unfolding on the united states. it was simply a reminder that a superpower has certain responsibilities in the world and needs
. jim baker said on "morning joe" today, this was a time when congress took on the foreign policy, first override of foreign policy veto of a president in that century. >> it really was. first let me say, i'm honored to be with my sister and friend maxine waters, who i think played a magnificent role giving momentum to the divestment effort. just quickly i want to go back and indicate a little known bit of history. >> why was mandela in oakland, california. of all places. yankee stadium, the mayor, mayor cuomo. he came to see you, didn't he? >> i was overwhelmed. nelson mandela. oakland doesn't win a lot of battles over big cities. he said i'm going to oakland to thank ron and his constituency. for this iconic human being to come to oakland to say thank you was an amazing event. we walk out on the stage and mandela looks out into this incredible sea of humanity. he said now i better understand you, i better understand your politics. i looked at him and he said you represent the human family. you represent where we must go. you represent the future of south africa. that was such an incred
and greet with castro. you don't want to be winging foreign policy, making big decisions at a funeral. however, away from cameras' grae glare, they might be able to get a word in. if obama can sneak it in without being taped doing it, he might try it. >> i heard a story from somebody in charge of white house security who was telling me about an event like this that provided an opportunity for a high-ranking u.s. official to meet with a u.s. enemy, but it did provide an opportunity that never would have been there before there was an opportunity for actual diplomacy. of course, on the other hand, as you pointed out, such things can be considered huge mistakes. there was the incident when president obama in 2009 was seen taking a picture, was taking a picture of him shaking hands hu. if cameras aren't around it might be with it. but if they are, to be avoided. >> exactly. you know, this is really a day where everybody's supposed to honor nelson mandela. i'm not sure it's a day of world foreign policy-making for nations. but as i mentioned, face time between world leaders is always benef
, joining us from bethesda, maryland. thank you for being with us on c-span. the foreign-policy initiative discusses secretary of state john kerry's tenure so far. and the overall foreign-policy challenges the foreign -- obama faces.tration lac and we will talk about supreme court judges. and genetically modified foods with new york university professor marian nussle. we will look for your reaction by phone, e-mail, and twitter. tonight, republican senator rand paul of kentucky speaking at the detroit economic club about jobs and the economy. former secretaries of state madeleine albright and hillary clinton come a remembering south african president nelson mandela. and a white house briefing with secretary jay carney. >> the book affairs events from washington, putting you in the room at congressional hearings, white house event, briefings, and conferences. and complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house. we are c-span, created by the cable tv industry and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. now you can watch us in hd. >> republican senator rand paul at the detroit ec
and a strong presence on foreign policy than a senator from indiana. there was a global push for this from faith leaders and from anti-segregationists here in this country. we heard just now the secretary general of the united nations that no one has done more. no one in our era and generation has done more to fight discrimination than the moral leadership and example of this man who suffered for 27 years yet came out of prison with his wife winnie at his side and she has been imprisoned for 18 months at that time. in the anc, they came out of prison and marched in that march and from then on, his days in prison spoke of reconciliation. for that that he won the nobel prize and went on as he became. he helped sign into law the law that outlawed discrimination against the white minority. that belief in reconciliation that created a new south africa. that was a model for nations for people around the world. >> did he do it with kindness? >> he did it with love and with kindness and wit and humor. when he came here, he so impressed american presidents, we know how close he was with bill clinto
hill a board member at transafrica the oldest foreign policy organization in the united states. transafrica was at the heart of the anti-apartheid fight in the 1980's and she traveled with nelson mandel la o mandela on hp to the united states. thank verthank you very much fog us. >> urchyou are both uniquely positioned to talk about nelson mandela. what was your reaction to the news that nelson mandela passed. >> we all expected that he would pass in the immediate future but we are deeply saddened by the loss of one of the world's great greatest leaders and statesmen. all of us mourn with the south africans on this sad and tragic day. >> silvia your reaction. >> very much the same. dying is a part of life. but with such a spirit that had really taken such a role of seeking justice. it almost seemed like an era i knew in my heart of hearts that phase of struggle. >> let us keep our love together so that we form a solid form against racism. we are sure that that day comes now. while our common actions let them show that justice tr triums without delay. when that has come to pass,
. nobody had overturned a presidential veto on foreign policy in the 20th century. you had 37 and 53 republicans, including richard lugar who is still there. mitch mcconnell who said he was in college during civil rights movement and then he was on the side of civil rights and then it got all complicated with affirmative action and bussing and sanctions he said made it all clear again. he stood up again against the president. i was covering the white house then and occasionally they would bring in small groups of reporters to chat with the president on the theor theory w each other. it was during this period the president said more black people drive and own cars in south africa than there are cars in the soviet union and to him that sort of rationalized, this was, you know, communism is the evil system. and you had po to do everything to stand up to communism. i remember clearly he reached for two cookies and said he had half a sandwich for lunch. pat buchanon was a speech writer in the white house then. i recalled this memory to him. he said he wrote that lean. he got it from comme
. it was the first override of a presidential veto on a foreign policy issue in the century. and anti-apartheid leaders credit those sanctions and credit the private divestment movement around the united states and around the world with bringing about the pressure and the isolation that was necessary to eventually humble the apartheid regime. to humble the ruling south african government and bring them to the negotiations that eventually freed nelson mandela and brought him into the apartheid system. the fight here to do that was nothing compared to the fight in south africa, but politically, it was a he can of a fight here too. joining us now is former california congressman and former oakland mayor, ron dellums. he was the sponsor of the 1986 antiapartheid act. congressman dellums, nice to see you. thank you very much for being here. >> it's an honor to be here. i'm one of your great fans, my friend. >> well, thank you. tell me what led you to sponsor the antiapartheid act in the 1986? >> a little-known fact in history is that a group of african-american employees of the polaroid co
the foreign policy initiative. nice to see you. thank you so much. you. >> all right. the site where paul walker died in a fiery car crash is now part of a crime scene. what two men are accused of stealing and how they apparently tried to show it off. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. medicare open enrollment. of year again. this season, discover aleve. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. buitbettoverage, tsaveoney, or both.d and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care la open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medica >>> a fox report now. more of the day's headlines. police say a teenager who went missing in new hampshire almost two months ago has contacted her mother. abigail hernandez sent a letter in october and her mom got it last month. >> los angeles is suing citigroup and wells fargo, accusing them of mortgage discrimination that led to a flood of forecloses after th
. more than half of americans also don't like the way he is handling foreign policy. immigration and the economy. the data now raising concerns over what can still be accomplished in his next few years as president. joining us now is our political panel angela mcgrewen, fox knew political analyst, and ronow molono. the president used to enjoy euphoric ratings. now his approval rating is abysmal on all kinds of issues. so ways happening overall? why is this happening? what kind of take do you look at this -- what prism do you look at this through, angela? >> the bottom line is this. are you better off today than you were four years ago? most americans that elected this president yet again, now they're having buyers remorse, because most americans are not better off. if you look at the unemployment rate at 7% but for the black community, last check, it was 13%. the hispanic community has not lowered that much and for women and young adults, if you have a college degree, kelly, most people don't have a job today, so people are looking at this situation and though the president is a
country. when he came to power, many wondered how he would steer the new country's foreign policy. after all the african national congress which he headed had been supported by the revolutionaries of the world. gadhafi, arafat, castro, but mandela knew what countries were in his best interests. he steered nit a pro democratic, pro western -- honoring his old comrades, never forgetting their support. his final act of greatness was leaving office. very few black african leaders had ever left office voluntarily in 1999 when nelson mandela did after just one term. he wanted to make sure that south african democracy didn't descend so -- he was in this sense south africa's george washington, as much as one man can shape's a country future, nelson mandela did it for south africa. and in doing so, he also shaped the consciousness of the entire world. let's get started. >>> let's go live to johannsberg to cnn's robin kernao. she joins us from outside his home in johannsberg, robin, there's a lot of talk about prayer and reflection. today's the day of prayer and reflection. there's lots of religi
by giving speeches, what's the danger there? >> there was concern as he reached out in the foreign policy area. presidents send to do that. what is different about obama is that i think probably at least since fdr he has pushed the limits of executive authority on domestic matters to the limits. on immigration reform he's decided not to and all welfare laws, education, anti-drug laws, he has simply decided not to enforce divisions of the law and the biggest example is obama care where the employer mandate was delayed a year. if you like your insurance, you get to keep it well. turns out the law says, no, you can't. so he directed the state incidents to direct the insurance companies to go ahead and provide the same policies they had had before and also there's no subsidy provided for the federal exchanges as there is the state exchange and these are a lot of examples that more than any recent president has pushed his power to the limit, thus raising the question about whether he is upholding himself to faith fully execute the laws. >> the president has made an announcement, members of con
have a foreign policy which has a strat eachic period in this region. and we believe that we need. to in fact, contain the spread of sectarian divided in region. we believe sectarianism is dangerous for the entire region. iran is certainly not interested in promoting that. in fact, we have talked to everybody from the very first days of assuming. i visited iraq and the core of my discussion with all iraqis, post shiia, kurd and arab was the need to contain the sectarian divide. we believe that is a fire that can engulf the entire region and beyond and we believe it is in the interest of every single state in the region as well as all of the peoples of the region to build on our commonalities and we have a great deal of commonality. fighting in syria, the border with lebanon is escalating. seven children have been he can executed there. the badge for the town is still underway. andrew simmons has been talking to some of the eyewitnesses to the fight. this is the only way out for syrian refugees escaping the battle of calamon. the slow down on the trail of those crossing the border
would say the press was biassed against cheney. they didn't like his hawkish foreign policy and he was subject to more caricature than others. >> bill clinton probably feels he's been caricature. >> dick cheney didn't do a lot of media interviews. he worried about looking like he was in charge by being too public and that fed the image in a counter intuitive way. >> why did he talk to you. he has his own book out about his history of heart problems. designee spent a good amount of time with me. very generous with his time. i hope they believe his time sets the record straight for history much he was undefensive, very calm, he's got his point of view and he feels firmly about it. >> looking back as a guy that covered the bush administration and still covers the white house, how much did reporters know at the time about what was really going on behind closed doors or do we always have to wait for the books and for people to be out of office. >> my current theory is maybe we get 20%. >> 20%. >> of what's really getting on. we get large trust. elm missing a lot of what's going on. this
by the foreign policy advisors as well as his defense minister as well as the economic affairs minister was also present in those talks, the two sides reaffirming their commitment to continue the strategic partnership between the united states and pakistan, however, the pakistan need was still concerned about the ongoing drone strikes in pakistan against where there is considerable anger now and most of the political parties that were blocking the nato supplies from going into afghanistan are still continuing with their protests. the americans would be concerned because they would be conducting a major logistic operation from withdrawing the hardware from the country and will be needing pakistans for the exercise and therefore there was a lot to talk about between washington and islamabad but the pakistans are trying to improve ties with u.s. and said high-level contacts between the two countries were helping matters. >> reporter: still ahead in sport we will have the latest from the series as australia continues dominance over england right after the break. ♪ consider this: the news of the d
that consideration. you can't undermine foreign policy. it will give obama time to see the deal through if it works and maybe they can go back and revert and say maybe they don't need to do sanctions. >> it is a work in progress, fluid situation. when we come back, members of the right flank would have you believe happy holidays is an affront to the way of life. culture warriors battle war on christmas, millions of americans fight just to have a christmas. we will discuss. i do a lot oresearch on angie's list before i do any projects on my home. i love my contractor, and i am so thankful to angie's list for bringing us together. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. for all those who sleep for all those who sleep too hot or too cool, now there's a solution. sleep number dual temp, the revolutionary temperature-balancing layer with active air technology that works on any mattress brand, including yours. it's only at a sleep number store, where this holiday season, the hottest sleep innovations make the coolest gifts - including sleep
're in a moment of what we call international unity, the foreign policy legacy of everything related to the apartheid regime was divided in this country and many other nations. you look at say the early origins of investment campaign where a young barack obama as a student was involved, many other young idealists and international humanitarians but it was not seen at the time as a way to actually break the regime. it was seen as first a symbolic step and then got traction. the international program against the apartheid regime was a huge factor. walk us through that. >> that's right. it took a long time to gain motion. it seemed idealistic at the beginning, like many younger obama, i remember taking part myself in the protest on college campuses. and but it gained speed, just because so many people caught onto it. in a sense it was the last really coherent global social protest movement. and of course, it was all rallying around mandela. i can remember very well from those days, free mandela was the great rallying cry as sit-ins and protests were formed on these campuses. so it reall
for human beings. now, obviously, there are lots of areas of american foreign policy that are ripe for criticism but to say the united states does not care about human beings does not seem to be a fair statement. how do you reconcile things like that that he said with the magnificence of his accomplishments and his forgiveness and everything great that he did? >> you know, we should be very humble in our approach about this, jake. 246 years legal slavery, 100 years of legal jim crow in our country, apartheid laws in this country gave rise to apartheid laws in south africa in 1948. even to now, apartheid is no longer a racial matter and social issues but economic, health care, educational, job apartheid is present even today, and he was simply saying that going into iraq was a preemptive strike, broke international law. as a matter of fact, the biggest demonstration in the history of the world took place that day, people saying do not invade iraq. now we admit that 100,000 plus iraqis have been killed, 6,000 plus americans have been killed, 50,000 plus injured, we were wrong. had th
-un is still not ready to meet anybody that has some substance, foreign policy background. he hasn't done that with the chinese. he hasn't done it with south koreans. again, it shows that he is probably right now spending his time consolidating his power, and he's replaced various generals from the old guard, keeping control of the military, the communist party. but what is so interesting is how publicly he humiliated his uncle in talking about his ouster. that they went out of their way to show that this was a very visible ouster. and i have never seen that done in north korea before with his father. they ousted people, but it was done on a more quiet basis. >> if dennis rodman leaves north korea with kenneth bay, the american sentenced to a long term, a prison sentence for apparently doing some missionary work, supposedly, in north korea, that would be encouraging to get the other american out, and dennis rodman would be praised if he were to leave together with kenneth bay, right? >> that's right. and rodman should concentrate on doing that. i don't think rodman takes my advice very we
in remembering our history accurately with apartheid as a foreign policy issue for the united states? >> it seems to me that we seem to forget apartheid in our own country. i was jailed for using the public library. i was jailed for trying to use -- my father -- lots of p.o.w.s didn't have the right to use toilets, hotels, motels. we couldn't use a toilet from texas to florida to maryland. we didn't have the right to vote. and so dr. king's victory was over skin color apartheid and political apartheid and changing world opinion. now, that same movement spilled over in a major way to be the impactful force for freedom in south africa against our own national policy at that time. we changed america's policy towards south africa by our own risk and sacrifice, because anti apartheid victory in america led to apartheid victory in south africa. >> rick, what do you think of that and the reverend's point about that interplay, relatively rare to have this kind of success and an international civil rights movement. >> well, we often forget that during the whole period of the cold war, there was actually a
with the council of foreign relations. book, "foreign policy begins at home." >> we have much more on jobs. we are going to be discussing companies, including apple versus samsung. >> good morning. it is jobs day. i am tom keene. with me is scarlet fu and alix steel. i am really looking at wages this morning. i want to see the wage dynamic. scarlet fu is looking maybe to build up the wage in bitcoins. >> a lot of people are wondering if it is in a bubble. alan greenspan believes so. to give mywant opinion. >> of course not. outlawed trading in the currency. bank of america initiated coverage with a target of $1300. matt dowd, political analyst, is with fast as guest host for the hour can you say this is something that washington needs to get up to speed on really quickly. >> i do not have concerns because i think -- that coin is the canary in the coal mine for what we will face in the next 10 years, cyber currency. there are lots of questions about whether or not there are algorithms and it can last over the course of the long haul, cyber currency is here to stay and somebody is going to be th
foreign policies was arrogant and racist. and he said moammar gadhafi, an international pariah at the time, was his friend. he went right ahead and visit gad da fi in tripoli. he was also friends with fidel castro. he vied him after he was rae leased from prison in 1990 and em based the cuban leader because of his support to end apartheid even while the rest of the world shunned castro for his communist dictatorship. in 2003, mandela joined those who were against the u.s.-led war against iraq, and not only called it a tragedy but said "what i am condemning is that one pow we are a president who has no foresight, who no can not think properly, is now wanting to plunge the world into a holocaust. "for those who will only see mandela as the gentle saint, remember, it was he himself who said, "i am no angel." instead, he was complex, imperfect, and human, and we do his memory more justice when we remember the entire man. joining me this morning, mark quarterman from the enough project, amy goodman, host and executive producer of democracy now, khalil mohammed, director of the schaumburg center
need a much more coherent foreign and national security policy? that's not on the front burper right now. unfortunately, the nature of the world as you remember 9/11, that can get on the front burner every morning. .. these are in refunds. this is the refund for your taxes. when i say crux, they send 585 checks to one address in singapore. they said over 850 checks to one address in lithuania. now, at one level you have to ask yourself, how you ended up with a government so mindless and so incompetent that it could do this. $4 billion is an big money, but if you had to choose between giving it away to crooks or spending it at the national institutes of health on research, i would argue it would probably be dramatically better to spend on research. i know this is a bold outside the box, unfair, you know -- what drives me crazy about congress is businesses effort to think this stuff through. and i'm writing a paper right now where i'm going to call foresight hearings. is the difference. oversight hearings are when a group of can't think it together and they pontificate for the opening
came during a foreign policy conversation at a washington think tank forum. nbc's kristen welker is live for us at the white house. kristen, did the president successfully sell his deal today? >> reporter: well, craig, i think that remains to be seen. but that is what he was doing. he was trying to sell this deal to the skeptics here in the united states, but also to israelis, a lot of israeli journalists in the audience there today. if you look at the polls inside israel, a lot of folks don't like this deal. so president obama trying to convince them of the merits of this deal, making the point that, look, it is a test. it's a six-month freeze of iran's nuclear program that will be tested by inspectors who will go into the country and determine their level of seriousness. he also made the point that of the $100 billion worth of sanctions, this scales back about $7 billion of those, leaving the main sanctions in place. here's a little bit more of what he had to say this afternoon. take a listen. >> if we could create an option in which iran eliminated every single nut and bolt of
budget deal and number of challenging foreign policy issues. >> difficult for commuters in washington. snow, ice, rain has millions slipping and slide ago long the northeast coast. >> drivers from new york city to boston face the fine line between rain and freezing rain. this storm stretches from alabama all the way through new england. the philadelphia area has been especially hard hit. jenn of our philadelphia station kyw is in nearby brenmar. >> reporter: we were supposed to get a few inches yesterday. by mid afternoon we found ourselves in the middle of a full blown snowstorm. snow covered roads proved deadly after a driver was struck and killed after he got out of his car after a minor crash. the 50 car pileup left dozens stranded for hours on the turnpike. across the state, the storm's power took many by surprise. >> the storm came out of nowhere. it just hit us. >> reporter: drivers found themselves spinning out or maneuvering vehicles on foot. at philadelphia international airport, more than eight and a half inches of snow fell forcing the ground stop for fl
and affordability. and those that provide excess and legal rights to foreign investors remained the policy space for nations to promote sustainable and inclusive development. and it's still ahead here on earth he is a world of birth control medicine may soon expand australian scientists claim they have come up with the birth control pill for men. well what men really interested in taking the pale more on that later break the room. the ruling i really am. i knew. i am i says. for years. it was a huge house. they would store this year. instead of working politicians manage your work right right vision. if we do the day when men would be takingirth contr pills not that day is finally in sight. scientists in australia say they are closer than ever to developing a nail oral contraceptive. this is coming from a study conducted by researchers at melbourne's monash university through extensive testing on mice researchers discovered that a combined fuel of the proteins responsible for controlling the transport of sperm through the reproductive system. and the investigators say that blocking these protein
the level of dizzy content among low paid foreign workers in this strictly governed city-state. comarls stratford,-- charles stratford, al jazeera. >>> next on al jazeera, we'll talk to a man who witnessed mandela's policies firsthand. the man known only as madiba. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm del walters. time is ticking for congress. on a laundry list of items. including that new spending bill. the bill would avoid another government shutdown. the house is scheduled to close for christmas on friday. >>> central african republic, african force he will be air lifted by american forces, they will also air lift equipment into that country. sectarian violence has engulfed the central african republic since march. >>> preparations for nelson mandela's funeral are taking place in kunu, scheduled to stay place on sunday. >>> as the world leaders gather in south africa, many have extraordinary stories to share about nelson mandela. earlier, i talked to the former ambassador to south africa, delano lewis. first of all, your reflections back on the man. >> well the reflections i mu
of state schultz and others, former senate foreign relations chairman dick lugar were pushing very strongly for a different policy. >> they were. they knew the veto was a mistake. right after that secretary schultz moved to redescribe anc not as terrorist organization and open up contacts with the group in osaka. >> you were on the ground when he came out -- >> after he came out. >> moved into the negotiations which were critical. >> went up and down in 1992, had a break in the negotiations, a serious break over violence. the two presidents, the two leaders, nelson mandela and f.w. de klerk came together, one of the things they agreed, which is a lesson for other peace processes that thereafter to acts of violence would be allowed to interrupt the peace process. the spoilers would not be allowed to do that. it was important because there was a lot of violence after that. >> that was also true of the northern ireland peace process. that was a key point they could not veto an agreement forward, a lesson not learned by israeli-palestinians sadly. what do you think was the special quality in ne
, in particular, foreign direct investment. i am pleased that we have already started to address the important questions of our trade policy, guided by our gatt commitments and the determination systematically to open the economy to global competition in a carefully managed process. soon we will also begin trade negotiations with, amongst others, the european union, the united states, our partners in the southern african customs unions and our neighbours in the southern african development community to provide a stable and mutually beneficial framework for our international economic relations. we will also be looking very closely at the question of enhancing south-south cooperation in general as part of the effort to expand our economic links with the rest of the world. consistent with our objective of creating a people-centred society and effectively to address the critical questions of growth, reconstruction and development, we will, together with organised labour and the private sector, pay special attention to the issue of human resource development. both the public and the private sector
on to foreign exchange rates we are seeing across on this curve. euro, fairly steady after a change in this rate. mario draghi suggested that policy tools are still up in the air. he didn't sound overly dovish about launching further stimulus programs. that has been supportive for the trade. dollar/yen rates, 102 handle is what we're looking at today. australian dollar below 109. let's check in with li sish juan out of singapore. >> thank you, karen. asian markets wrapped up the week on u.s. jobs numbers and that could provide a tipping point for the fed trigger. the nikkei 225 stabilized, rebounding 0.8% after the 0.6% drop over the past two sessions. the abe government unveiled the $54 billion stimulus package that's aimed at offsetting the sales tax in april. and the shanghai composite pulled further ahead. meanwhile, the hang seng index added 0.1%. elsewhere, south korea and australia both ended just a tad lower. as for individual stocks, chinese property stocks came under some pressure after the official china securities journal reported beijing may remove caps on property prices next year,
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